Trial Offer

FAQ

What is Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a grappling martial art with roots in traditional Japanese Jiu-Jitsu and Judo, modified initially from the Gracie family in Brazil, They introduced their family brand of the art, which they coined and trademarked, Gracie Jiu-Jitsu, to the United States in the mid 1990’s, through the early UFC’s and style versus style challenge matches. In more modern times the competitive sport aspect of BJJ has exploded in popularity and the sport itself has continued to evolve due to its exposure to American wrestling competitive culture as well as the eclectic nature of exposure and blending with other grappling arts (such as Sambo and Judo)  BJJ is now a major portion of the MMA fighting formula, as well as an integral part of Army and Law Enforcement combatives, along with its current modern face as a grappling centric tournament sport

What is Gracie Jiu Jitsu?

Gracie Jiu-jitsu is the Gracie family brand of Japanese Jiu-Jitsu/Judo which they modified through years of trial and error, originally passed down to them by Mitsuyo Maeda, a Japanese Judo expert and avid prize-fighter (who had fought all over the world)  The underlying principles of GJJ focus on effective self defense against a larger and heavier opponent. The martial art came to worldwide prominence when Royce Gracie won the first few UFC’s using the family’s art in limited-rules, no time limit, no weight class, tournament setting (which at that time was unprecedented)

What is the difference between Jiu Jitsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?

The main difference between classical or Japanese Jiu-Jitsu and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is the strategic imperative to take the fight to the ground, pin and exhaust the opponent, until they are able to employ a submission to make their opponent surrender. Classical Jiu-jitsu while employing similar grappling techniques typically don’t emphasize the sharpening of these skills against a resisting opponent in live grappling training sessions (what would be referred to in Judo as “Ne Waza”)

What is the difference between Gracie Jiu Jitsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?

Gracie Jiu-jitsu is the Gracie family brand of Japanese Jiu-Jitsu/Judo which they modified through years of trial and error, originally passed down to them by Mitsuyo Maeda, a Japanese Judo expert and avid prize-fighter (who had fought all over the world)  The underlying principles of GJJ focus on effective self defense against a larger and heavier opponent. It is often said that “All Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has roots in Gracie Jiu-Jitsu, but not all Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. This distinction calls to attention that while the modern sport of tournament BJJ has evoked growth and evolution in the movement and strategies of grappling, it has strayed from its self-defense roots where these strategies would be applicable in anything other than a sport specific competitive setting.

What is the point of Jiu Jitsu?

The practice of Jiu-Jitsu is characterized by the application of control strategies, involving the maximum use of leverage to your advantage, against a resisting opponent with the ultimate goal of subduing them via pinning position and eventual submission, typically a joint lock or choke. This is the overall strategy and goal whether in competition or street encounter

What are the belt ranks in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?

The Belt Ranks for BJJ (for adults) are: White, Blue, Purple, Brown, and Black Belt

Which is better BJJ or MMA?

This will depend on your goals and personal preference - MMA will offer access to striking/takedown emphasis and more a ballistic modality of training that comes with that, which also brings with it the risk of injury associated with those training elements. BJJ will focus mostly on grappling, while not uncommon to learn takedowns, the vast majority of BJJ training typically takes place in the ground, mitigating the chance of injury (if premature introduction into sparring. Is also avoided) and will yield the benefits of a deeper understanding that comes only focusing on one (major) aspect of fighting as opposed to spreading yourself to through three disciplines or more.

Why is Jiu Jitsu so effective?

There are many reasons why Jiu-Jitsu is effective, particularly when compared to other more traditional striking martial arts, the most obvious is that it specializes in a range where a serous combat encounter most typically happens, in the clinch or grappling range. Even two combatants who are committed to striking each other, will through aggressive force unwittingly find themselves in this range and often be unable to avoid it if they do commit to exerting any form of offense (think of how often you see two pro boxers clinch or two street brawlers headlock each other and hit the ground) The other more nuanced element that makes Jiu-Jitsu so effective is their training methodology which places a premium on accomplishing their strategic combat goals against a resisting opponent. But unlike the striking arts, whose frequency of striking sparring is limited by nature of high impact injuries (usually in an effort to prevent major head trauma) BJJ sparring typically does not involve striking and this affords them the opportunity to spar much more frequently and often with a higher intensity that would not be possible with any consistency in the striking arts. This amplified time of perfecting their techniques in a resisting opponent tends to hone their skills more sharply.

Am I too old for Kickboxing?

There are various forms of exercise that comprise a kickboxing training and a typical kickboxing class – from bodyweight calisthenics to equipment training that includes jump rope, heavy bags, and medicine balls, to partner drills that include pad work, all the way to contact-sparring sessions. They can be categorized as generally moderate to high intensity and possibly high impact. The key factors that determine whether the training environment is appropriate for people of all ages would include a format free of mandatory, contact sparring (to decrease the chance of head trauma) and where one is free to pace themselves and work up to the higher intensity and impact drills and exercises that the class may be comprised of. As with all contact sports, your personal affinity, and willingness to acknowledge that the occasional bumps and bruises are part and parcel of such activities should be the first box that you need to check off before worrying about age.

Am I too old for Muay Thai?

There are various forms of exercise that comprise a kickboxing training and a typical Muay Thai class – from bodyweight calisthenics to equipment training that includes jump rope, heavy bags, and medicine balls, to partner drills that include pad work, all the way to contact-sparring sessions. They can be categorized as generally moderate to high intensity and possibly high impact. The key factors that determine whether the training environment is appropriate for people of all ages would include a format free of mandatory, contact sparring (to decrease the chance of head trauma) and where one is free to pace themselves and work up to the higher intensity and impact drills and exercises that the class may be comprised of. As with all contact sports, your personal affinity, and willingness to acknowledge that the occasional bumps and bruises are part and parcel of such activities should be the first box that you need to check off before worrying about age.

How many calories do you burn at Kickboxing training?

While the structure and intensity of every kickboxing class will tend to vary, just as the participants individual’s body weight and level of exertion will also factor into the number of calories, it is often cited that one can burn from 450 to 750 calories in a typical one hour kickboxing class.

How many times a week should I attend?

Consistency is ultimately more important than frequency. A steady regimen of 2-3 classes per week has been shown to yield the most gains while still allowing for enough time to adequately recover between workouts

Is Kickboxing good for kids?

Kickboxing training, as with most competitive sports, can be a great tool to build confidence, physical strength, and camaraderie/social skills (from the class setting) When talking about martial arts training for kids, there are two perspectives that need to be taken into account – the usefulness in context of dealing with bullies. On the one hand, you can make the argument that knowing how to box, punch, and kick, will empower the child to fight back and defend themselves effectively. On the other hand, a strong argument can be made that the notion of “fighting fire with fire”, especially if the child (or adult for that matter) does not have a healthy and mature association with these tactics, might back fire and perpetuate more bullying behavior. The striking arts by their very nature are offensive tools that cause blunt force trauma and there should be great care in understanding the limited violence scalability this toolset offers a bullied child.

Is Kickboxing and Muay Thai the same?

No. Muay Thai is the national ring sport of Thailand and deeply rooted in the history of Thai culture. The term “Kickboxing”, when it was introduced was meant to denote a new sport that incorporated western boxing hands, allowed kicking – from Japanese Karate styles – but was restricted to mostly above the waist targets with no clinch work or grappling allowed (the use of knees would vary but elbows were almost always forbidden) This sport was the natural evolution of martial arts competition from the decade before (mid 1960’s) which mostly consisted of Karate point fighting (from non-contact to full contact) often with little or no hand-protection in an open arena setting, once full-contact became the order of the day, then a natural evolution towards boxing style strikes and gloves followed, along with changing the setting to include both combatants in a boxing ring. In contrast to the western boxing or Muay Thai trunks that are typical now and in an effort to pay homage to their karate roots but also differentiate themselves to some degree, the combatants fought bare chested (no Gi top) but with Karate style uniform pants, and sometimes wearing their Black Belts to boot. This became the trademark look for “American Kickboxing” as it emerged in the late 70’s and early 80’s
The term, Kickboxing, in the modern era has become a generic term for the many iterations of stand-up striking ring sports that include kicks. You can also make the argument that if it involves – knees, elbows, and clinch work, then it is Muay Thai. However, there are also European (specifically, Dutch) and Japanese iterations of the sport. When someone mentions these, the former in particular, they do not say, Dutch Muay Thai, they refer to it as, “Dutch style Kickboxing” - which is often a contrast to traditional Muay Thai in that it emphasizes boxing hands far more than kicking or clinching as they Thais do.

Is Muay Thai good for self-defense?

Muay Thai is an excellent martial art for self-defense. It develops and emphasizes strong and explosive strikes and conditions its participants to absorb blows with their block techniques in regular practice. Unlike other striking arts, whose sparring and competitive aspects ban fighting from within the clinch and standing grappling ranges (i.e. – how boxers end up getting separated when they clinch) Muay Thai has a very strong element of clinch work and also promotes expertise in striking with close quarter tools like the elbow and knee (which are often far more damaging that a typical punch)  Like most striking arts however, the main drawback in a self-defense scenario for a practitioner of Muay Thai is the lack of familiarity with ground grappling and (this cannot be overstated) the willingness to enter into an exchange of blows with what might potentially be a bigger and stronger opponent, intent on knocking you out. There is always a risk that’s assumed if your strategy falls along the same line as your opponent (debilitation as opposed to neutralization)

Could not find an answer?

Send us your question and we will add it to the FAQ section.